MMS makes major training investment as co-directors attend Montessori Whole-School Management Course

MMS Co-Directors Suzanne Sanders and Jennifer Carriger with David Kahn, executive director of the North American Montessori Teachers Association and the "grandfather of international Montessori."

MMS Co-Directors Suzanne Sanders and Jennifer Carriger with David Kahn, executive director of the North American Montessori Teachers Association and the “grandfather of international Montessori.”

MMS Co-Directors Jennifer Carriger and Suzanne Sanders learned from and with Montessori administrators from across the United States (and the world) at a four-day Montessori Whole-School Management professional development seminar presented by the North American Montessori Teachers’ Association (NAMTA) in Columbia, Maryland, in October.  Since becoming co-directors in February 2015, Jennifer and Suzanne have participated in several non-profit management and educational leadership programs to ensure the highest quality programs and responsible stewardship for our school.

In addition to Jennifer and Suzanne’s coursework, MMS made a significant investment in Montessori training and professional development for teachers and staff over the past year. Four faculty members pursued certification programs offered through the American Montessori Society(AMS) and/or the Association Montessori Internationale (AMI), the two most widely recognized Montessori credential organizations worldwide. In addition, faculty from the Virginia Center for Montessori Studies led AMS Montessori Assistant training for 12 faculty members this summer, and all MMS teachers completed Positive Discipline in the Classroom coursework.

 

About AMI Montessori Whole-School Management

“Since 1988, NAMTA has documented best administrative practices and provided professional development to administrators with one overarching principle in mind: Montessori schools, in order to retain their authenticity over time, need Montessori-oriented administrators who understand the specific operational aspects of Montessori pedagogy.

Julianna Phillips, third from right, and sister Montessori educators at the Greater Cincinnati Center for Montessori Education.

MMS lead guide Julianna Phillips, third from right, and sister Montessori educators at the Greater Cincinnati Center for Montessori Education.

The increasing complexity of Montessori school structure means that the Montessori school must reintegrate its parts to complete the developmental continuum. This is an extraordinary endeavor as the Montessori school must embody the Montessori vision of successive prepared environments, indoors and outdoors, encompassing the natural and human-built worlds through all academic disciplines from concrete to abstract, from eighteen months to eighteen years. The more comprehensive the Montessori vision, the more complicated the institution and the larger and more diverse the staff. There is also more difficulty in staying organic and remaining focused on the organic whole, which is simply children and their intrinsic needs in contact with the appropriate ‘prepared environment,’ including the natural environment. The implementation of Montessori Whole-School Management requires not just administration but visionary leadership, which is as much a test of character as it is of knowledge.”

 

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