Mountaineer Montessori collecting WV flood relief donations

WV Flood Relief-MMSMountaineer Montessori School will collect accept financial contributions for West Virginians impacted by this week’s devastating floods at its make-and-take art booth from 10:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m. today, June 25, as part of the FestivALL Children’s Art Fair at the Kanawha County Library on Capitol Street. Funds collected will be forwarded to the West Virginia Chapter of the American Red Cross. Please open your hearts and wallets to the many throughout the Mountain State who are hurting today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Meet up with Mountaineer Montessori this summer!

MMS-Meet-up-cover_4

Mountaineer Montessori School is offering a series of “Montessori Meet-Ups” to connect families with a wide range of educational, entertaining and enriching summer activities. The events are open to MMS families, alumni, community friends, newcomers and others interested in learning and living the Montessori way.

  • Saturday, June 11, 11:00 a.m. — Meet-Up at the Greenbrier Pool (5103 Chesterfield Ave, Charleston, WV 25304).  Admission is $3.00 per person for non-members.  Concession stand available.  For more information, contact Alisa Abdalla at ilovecooking03@aol.com
  • Friday, June 17, 7:05 p.m. — Meet-Up at Appalachian Power Park for a WV Power Game and fireworks.  Families should plan to purchase individual tickets for Section 102.  For more information, please contact Elizabeth Scharman at escharman@hsc.wvu.edu
  • Tuesday, June 22, 5:30 p.m. reception/6:00 p.m screening. — Adult’s Night out at Taylor Books for the WV International Film Festival screening of the 2016 Oscar-nominated Short Films. For more information, contact Suzanne Sanders at ssanders@mountaineermontessori.org
  • Saturday, June 25 — FestivAll Children’s Art Fair.  Please stop by the MMS booth at the Kanawha County Public Library for a child-friendly make-and-take art project.  For more information, contact Jennifer Carriger at jcarriger@mountaineermontessori.org
  • Saturday, June 25, 3:00-5:00 p.m. — FestivAll Art-for-All Children’s Art Show reception and awards ceremony at the Clay Center.  For more information, contact Jennifer Carriger at jcarriger@mountaineermontessori.org
  • Sunday, July 10, 1:30 p.m. — Meet-Up at the Kanawha State Forest Pool.  Admission is $4 for adults and $3 for children.
  • Saturday, July 30, 1:00 p.m. — Meet-Up for Cotton Hill excursion.  Details TBA.

 


It was a very good year–order your MMS yearbook!

cGreenbrier 086MMS is thrilled to announce the upcoming publication of “Hand in Hand,” the 2015-16 yearbook.

We are working with Tree Ring, a publisher that offers customized school publications at a much lower cost than traditional yearbook companies or online photo book services. Tree Ring publications are printed on recycled paper and the company, working with Trees for the Future, will plant a tree in our name for each book ordered.

“Hand in Hand” will be a high-quality, 88-page, hardback, full-color book that captures all of the excitement of the school year, featuring class photos and shots from all of our classrooms and special classes (art, music, etc.), after school activities, field trips and many special events presented over the past nine months.

In addition, each order includes the opportunity to customize two pages with individual student art and photos from the school year. Additional customized pages may be purchased for an additional cost. What a great way to capture your child’s special memories and accomplishments!

Cost: $40.00 each

Order deadline: June 30. All orders must be placed by June 30 to avoid extra shipping charges and arrive with main delivery to our school. All payments will be handled by Tree Ring.

Deadline to customize pages: June 30

Delivery date: Books will be delivered to MMS at the end of July/early August for pickup. We will include school events and activities through June 30. Yearbooks may be mailed for an additional fee.

To order and customize pages:

Please go to Tree Ring to get started.

The MMS pass code is 101463315626468

Don’t miss this opportunity to capture the memories of a special year for MMS and your child. Order today!

For more information:

Salon: On-Demand Yearbooks Save Schools and Parents Big Money: Tree Ring

How to Purchase MMSYearbook

How to Customize Pages in Your Yearbook

 

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Reveal an evening of creative fun at MASQUERADE

Masquerade-Logo_tag_MMS

    Saturday, April 9, 2016

    7:00 to 10:00 p.m.

    University of Charleston

Reveal a night of creative fun

ELiza CFor 40 years, Mountaineer Montessori School has nurtured the next generation of West Virginia leaders, offering a child-centered, world class education option to children right here in Charleston. MMS currently serves 125 children ages 3-14, and is the largest, oldest and most recognized Montessori school in the state. Corporate, foundation and philanthropic investment in our mission enables us meet the growing demand for quality alternatives to one-size-fits all education.

 

 

 

An evening of elegance and intrigue

The Carpenter Ants, West Virginia's premier R&B band, will rock the house at Masquerade.

The Carpenter Ants, West Virginia’s premier R&B band will rock the house at Masquerade.

MASQUERADE, to be held Saturday, April 9, 2016, 7:00-10:00 p.m. at the University of Charleston, is a major fundraiser for our school. Proceeds will benefit MMS financial aid, teacher training and growth opportunities.

An evening of intrigue and elegance, MASQUERADE invites supporters to:

  • Rock out to The Carpenter Ants and Steve Himes.
  • Reveal their creative side through artistic fun.
  • Revel with live music, wine and dessert tastings, live and silent auctions…and more!
  • Reveal the promise of education for the next generation of business and community leaders, innovators and creators, dreamers and doers…

 

 

Ticket information

Steve Himes will open Masquerade with his signature jazz/blues guitar sounds.

Steve Himes will open Masquerade with his signature jazz/blues guitar sounds.

 

Individual tickets start at $60.00 per person. You can purchase them online at Event Brite.

Each regular reservation includes admission to the party, light hors d’ouevres, six wine/dessert tastings, and one additional ticket for beer or wine. You may purchase additional drink tickets. Coffee and soda are included. Each guest will receive a gift. Sponsors enjoy additional perks depending upon their level of support.

For more information, please contact Katie McFadden: katie.mechler@gmail.com; 202/701-7400 (cell/text).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attire

C 3-24-16 116The suggested attire for MASQUERADE is cocktail/creative. Masks are encouraged, but not required. Students have been making masks for their parents….please feel free to wear a student creation or purchase one of your own. Costumes are NOT required.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Creative fun

Students are helping their parents get ready for Maquerade by creating masks for them.

Students are helping their parents get ready for Masquerade by creating masks for them.

Let your creative side run free at MASQUERADE, which will feature funky photo-ops, mask making and other artistic activities. Students are creating amazing class arts projects that will highlight the silent auction. They’re also helping their parents dress for the occasion by creating colorful masks to bring to the event.

 

 

 

 

 

 

C 3-24-16 017CCharly Hamilton chairs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

c Mobile made from vintage silver by MMS primary studentsC Names of the artistsC Tile quilt by 3-4 year old students

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sponsors (as of March 31, 2016)

Gold 

Advantage Technology

Benjamin Bailey and Brian Glasser

BrickStreet Insurance

Silver

Columbia Pipeline Group

Randall J. Hill, M.D. & Aaron R. Parry, M.D.

Bronze

Aric Margolis Architecture

Dawn Bolyard

Diana Johnson

McKinley Carter Wealth Services

 

 

Sponsorship invitation

High profile fun at the 2014 MMS "Prom Night" fundraiser.

High profile fun at the 2014 MMS “Prom Night” fundraiser.

MMS is pleased to offer a wide range of exclusive education investment opportunities to our community partners participating in MASQUERADE. Your partnership in this high-profile, distinctive initiative will showcase your commitment to West Virginia’s children before thousands throughout the Kanawha Valley and provide critical support to MMS.  Contributions to MMS, a 501(c)(3) organization are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law. 

We invite you to review our Education Investment Opportunities: MMS 2016 Masquerade Sponsorship Packet

For more information about sponsorships, please contact JoEllen Zacks at marketing@mountaineermontessori.org or call 312/622-3008 (cell/text).

 

 

Silent auction contributions

2013 MMS silent auction.

2014 MMS silent auction.

The MASQUERADE silent auction will showcase an incredible array of dining and entertainment packages, fashion and beauty items, jewelry, sports memorabilia, art and home accents…and more.  Bring your checkbook and pick up the perfect gift for Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, graduation, wedding or shower.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Art C

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Fun, friendship and fundraising with MMS: Scenes from 2013-15

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Children smile a lot when they run: UC-MMS students train for race

 

UC-MMSUniversity of Charleston freshman are partnering with local elementary students to build a healthy future for the community as part of the UC Welch Colleague Half Marathon/5K to be held Saturday, March 19.

Nineteen UC First Year Experience Program participants have been training after school four days a week for the past two months with more than 70 Mountaineer Montessori School elementary students to get them ready for the 5K portion of the event.

 

Read the Charleston Gazette-Daily Mail article: UC-Mountaineer Montessori off to a running start

UC requires each class to plan and execute a service learning project within the freshman year.  Professor Hallie Dunlap, assistant professor of social sciences, has led her section of freshmen as they work with young athletes to build fundamental jogging and running skills.  The young MMS runners and their UC mentors will sport a custom UC/MMS combined t-shirt designed specifically to represent the program’s efforts.

Race for Education 2015 101After school training has been supplemented by twice-weekly running and jogging sessions as part of the MMS Physical Education program.

The goal of this project collaboration is to encourage children to be active and live a healthy lifestyle from an early age. Varun Shah, Peer Educator for the University 102 section, says the group’s goal “is to bring awareness of a growing national problem, obesity.”

“We chose to do a Couch to 5K-type event because it would be a good stepping stone for living a healthy life.  We chose to work with kids because they are the most impressionable group, and their habits would carry on work towards a healthier future.”

MMS, located at 308 20th Street in Kanawha City, has enjoyed a long collaboration with UC, its landlord and education partner.

C MMS UC Running Program 035

The MMS students weren’t the only ones who are benefiting from this latest collaboration, says Chillag, sharing her observations:

  • UC students didn’t imagine that they would grow to look forward to training sessions as much as they did – they began to understand that the MMS students counted on them and looked forward to seeing them and talk to them at scheduled times each week.
  • UC students realized quickly that young children smile a lot when they run.  We have speculated a lot about when we stop smiling and running and why that happens.
  • The time together became more than just preparation about running the 5K, but about our time together and learning about one another.
  • A lot of the MMS students were impressed that a number of UC student athletes were their trainers.
  • UC students quickly noted that MMS students would not be deterred from running in inclement weather.  At first, they emailed me, most certain that MMS trainings would be cancelled due to snow and rain only to realize that on those days, we had some of our biggest turn out in our after school training sessions.  MMS and UC trainers trained through cold, rain, ice, and snow to now, finally, be training in the sunshine.
  • I will say too that, as their professor, that this experience allowed me to get to know my students in a different way.  It expanded the opportunity for me to experience the students – some of my students who are the most quiet inside the classroom are the most enthusiastic and boisterous in the training sessions.  I found it easier as well to get some students to trainings than class.
  • Lastly, it is well understood that keeping kids active and at a healthy weight (and never gaining unnecessary weight) is the best recipe for life long health.  Walking and jogging and running is an easy thing to do almost anywhere and it costs very little.  We hope to establish habits with MMS children for lifelong health. 

 

CMMS UC Running Program 013c MMS UC Running Program 062C MMS UC Running Program 011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:

 

 

 

 

 

ABOUT THE UC WELCH COLLEAGUE HALF MARATHON/5K:

The University of Charleston will host the second annual Welch Colleague 5K and Half Marathon Races on Saturday, March 19, 2016.

The races will start at the University’s MacCorkle Avenue location, with the Half-Marathon beginning at 8 am and the 5k following at 8:15 am.

The Welch Colleague program is designed to amplify the leadership abilities of UC students.  Senior Colleagues within the capstone level of the program carry out a community engagement project each year to exemplify their acquired leadership skills.

This years’ race was designed to be the only spring half marathon held in the Charleston/Huntington area, and features many unique components, all developed by students.

Highlights include:

Certification of the course by the USATF

Local companies employed for the manufacturing of our award medals

Involvement with local elementary school students to get students to participate in the race to promote healthy lifestyle choices.

The race medals were designed by local master potter, Julie Wingard of Fayettville, WV.  The medals are glazed clay cutouts of WV, with a UC Half Marathon logo pressed in the center.  Additionally, Hallie Dunlap, Assistant Professor of Social Sciences at the University of Charleston, and her University 102 students are working in collaboration with Mountaineer Montessori School to coach elementary students in preparation for the 5K event.  UC and MMS students will continue to train together, four days each week, up until the date of the race.

Additional information can be found at http://www.uchalfmarathon5k.com/#!shop/cz1e.


MMS wins state chess championship

Chess Champsc 017Congratulations to Eli Painter and Sam Lopinsky of the MMS Lower Elementary Chess Team, who brought home the state championship in the K-3 Division. We are very proud of our chess program, which year after year, brings home individual and team championships to MMS.  Thank you to Coach Jason Winesburg and congratulations to all of our hard working chess players!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From the Charleston Gazette-Daily Mail, 3-8-16

Students test chess skills in tournament

CHRIS DORST | Gazette-Mail photos
Middle school and high school students set up their chess boards and timers on Saturday before starting the first round of the West Virginia Scholastic Chess Championship. Nearly 100 students from elementary, middle and high schools across the state competed in the tournament at West Virginia State University. Winners go on to compete in national tournaments later in the year.

 

The game of chess can get intense as it pits players against one another in a battle of the mind. That’s why a skilled player must always be aware, plotting his or her next move and the moves of the opponent all while taking score and keeping track of time.

For 90 students on Saturday, their skills were tested during the West Virginia Scholastic Chess Championship, an all-day tournament that determines which three of the state’s best chess players will go on to national competitions later this year.

“Chess is all about thinking and forming strategies,” said Craig Timmons, one of the tournament’s coordinators.

That’s also what Clare Higgins told a group of Horace Mann Middle School students huddled around her before they started their games. Clare, who has been playing chess for eight years and competing in the annual championship since second grade, was one of the most experienced players in Saturday’s tournament, which was at West Virginia State University.

In a pep talk that sounded more like a battle cry, the Capital High sophomore said winning requires paying attention. It also takes calculation.

“This isn’t the place to try out new plans,” she said, looking from player to player. “Stick to your game. You know your game.”

Chess requires quick thinking. Timmons said players in Saturday’s tournament, many of whom also participate in regional spelling, math, geography and other scholastic competitions, are adept competitors already familiar with the rigors of the game.

“They’re all very academic, smart kids,” he said.

Many, like Clare, have been competing for years. She and her fellow Capital High team members have been playing in the championship since they attended Piedmont Elementary. They also played as a team at Horace Mann. They’ve gone on to win several school championships, Clare said.

Robert Greer, chief tournament director, said chess has grown in popularity in recent years as kids come back and new ones enter the competition.

“It’s being recognized as an outstanding supplement for academics,” Greer said when asked why the game has seen a spike in participation. “Here, they learn team skills, but it also requires them to think for themselves.”

Another reason chess may be growing in popularity among academically inclined students is that it’s an inclusive game.

“It’s good for all students,” Greer said, adding that regardless of their age, gender or ability “they compete on the same playing field.”

It’s as if players are drawn to the competition, Timmons said.

“Kids come back year after year,” he said.

Timmons said he thinks many players are drawn to chess because it is a game of strategy. For others in Saturday’s tournament, Timmons said it provides a team environment for players who may not want to play baseball or football.

While chess is a game of wits, players still need to be in good shape, Greer said. Because tournaments can last hours, experienced players know to eat healthy and get plenty of rest so they stay alert on game day.

Saturday marked the tournament’s 49th year. Student teams from all over the state participated.

The tournament started as a high school only competition in the 1960s, but middle schoolers were invited years later. Soon after that, the tournament was opened up to any grade school student.

Today, players are paired in those age groups.

Other than age, matches are determined by a player’s chess ranking, which is determined by the outcomes of previous tournaments. The top players are matched against the bottom players. For instance, if there are 20 players, the No. 1 ranked player faces No. 9. Second plays 10th.

Greer said rankings are more of a guide though, used to instill order into the tournament.

“The big kid doesn’t always win,” he said.

Sometimes, even the most skilled players lose, Timmons said, adding that the clock can beat them before their opponent does.

Saturday’s games were timed. Players were given between 30 and 60 minutes for each game, depending on their age.

There were four sessions. Players who won in the first moved on to face in the second others who won. Each session paired down winners until a champion was determined.

Timmons said he hopes to do something special next year for the tournament’s 50th year.

Clare Higgins, from Capital High School, won top female player, and will be nominated to represent West Virginia at the National Girls Invitational Tournament in August. Malvika Bendre, of Overbrook Elementary School, won first place in the K-3 Division, and Thomas Ward, from Piedmont Elementary, won first place in the K-5 Division. Nicholas Palmer, of Notre Dame High School in Harrison County, won first place in the K-8 Division and will be nominated to represent West Virginia at the Barber Tournament of K-8 Champions. Parker Benson, of Lincoln High School in Harrison County, won first place in the K-12 Division and will be nominated to represent West Virginia at the Denker Tournament of High School Champions.

The team winners for the tournament were as follows: K-3 first place was awarded to Mountaineer Montessori School, K-5 first place went to Piedmont Elementary School, K-8 first place was awarded to Notre Dame High School and K-12 first place went to Lincoln High School.

Reach Samuel Speciale at sam.speciale@wvgazettemail.com, 304-348-7939 or follow @samueljspeciale on Twitter.

 

 


Nana knows best: Observations from a Montessori educator & grandmother

Dylan 3“Look, Nana! It’s Europe,” exclaimed three-year old-Dylan as he pulled out an irregular shaped piece of red construction paper from his backpack. As a retired Montessori teacher, I recognized it right away. “I see you poked it out,” I acknowledged with a smile on my face.

To some, that small bit of red paper may have looked like just a scrap, but after 39 years in a Montessori classroom and now a Montessori grandmother, I knew it represented much, much more. In his carefully prepared classroom at Mountaineer Montessori, Dylan was offered a myriad of stimulating activities from which to choose. That day, he decided to undertake a demanding and time-consuming fine motor activity. Under the guidance of his well-trained teacher, he learned how to carefully grasp the poking tool and punch holes precisely on the outline of Europe. Completing this work required concentration, self-control, and perseverance. You can imagine his feeling of accomplishment when, after considerable effort, he was able to hold the shape of Europe in his hands.

That is the beauty of the Montessori classroom. It offers the child an environment designed to thoughtfully exercise his natural tendencies for exploration, manipulation, repetition, exactness, activity, work and self-perfection. It allows the child the freedom to follow his internal motivation and to make the choices that will satisfy his needs while under the watchful eye of knowledgeable adults. The result is a child who develops qualities that support life-long learning.

photo 1I am so pleased that my grandson, Dylan, is attending Mountaineer Montessori School. As soon as I observed the Primary classroom, I knew it was the best setting to help him reach his full potential. I look forward to sharing many Montessori moments with him!

By Jane Reifsynder, a retired Montessori educator with 39 years of experience, and grandmother of Dylan, who is now six.

If you are considering Montessori for your child, we invite you to call our office to schedule a tour: 304/342-7870.


Reveal an evening of fun and fundraising at Masquerade

Masquerade-Logo_tag_MMS

 

    Saturday, April 9, 2016

    7:00 to 10:00 p.m.

    University of Charleston

 

 

ELiza CFor 40 years, Mountaineer Montessori School has nurtured the next generation of West Virginia leaders, offering a child-centered, world class education option to children right here in Charleston. MMS currently serves 125 children ages 3-14, and is the largest, oldest and most recognized Montessori school in the state. Corporate, foundation and philanthropic investment in our mission enables us meet the growing demand for quality alternatives to one-size-fits all education.

 

 

 

 

An evening of elegance and intrigue

The Carpenter Ants, West Virginia's premier R&B band, will rock the house at Masquerade.

The Carpenter Ants, West Virginia’s premier R&B band will rock the house at Masquerade.

MASQUERADE, to be held Saturday, April 9, 2016, 7:00-10:00 p.m. at the University of Charleston, is a major fundraiser for our school. Proceeds will benefit MMS financial aid, teacher training and growth opportunities.

An evening of intrigue and elegance, MASQUERADE invites supporters to:

  • Reveal their creative side through artistic fun.
  • Revel with live music, wine and dessert tastings, live and silent auctions…and more!
  • Reveal the promise of education for the next generation of business and community leaders, innovators and creators, dreamers and doers…

 

 

 

Creative fun

Students are helping their parents get ready for Maquerade by creating masks for them.

Students are helping their parents get ready for Masquerade by creating masks for them.

Let your creative side run free at MASQUERADE, which will feature funky photo-ops, mask making and other artistic activities. Students are creating amazing class arts projects that will highlight the silent auction. They’re also helping their parents dress for the occasion by creating colorful masks to bring to the event.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sponsorship invitation

High profile fun at the 2014 MMS "Prom Night" fundraiser.

High profile fun at the 2014 MMS “Prom Night” fundraiser.

MMS is pleased to offer a wide range of exclusive education investment opportunities to our community partners participating in MASQUERADE. Your partnership in this high-profile, distinctive initiative will showcase your commitment to West Virginia’s children before thousands throughout the Kanawha Valley and provide critical support to MMS.  Contributions to MMS, a 501(c)(3) organization are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law. 

We invite you to review our Education Investment Opportunities: MMS 2016 Masquerade Sponsorship Packet

For more information about sponsorships, please contact JoEllen Zacks at marketing@mountaineermontessori.org or call 312/622-3008 (cell/text).

 

 

 

Ticket information

Steve Himes will open Masquerade with his signature jazz/blues guitar sounds.

Steve Himes will open Masquerade with his signature jazz/blues guitar sounds.

Individual tickets start at $60.00 per person.

For more information, please contact Katie McFadden: katie.mechler@gmail.com; 202/701-7400 (cell/text).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Live and silent auction contributions welcomed

2013 MMS silent auction.

2014 MMS silent auction.

Business and individual supporters are invited to advance our mission with a donation of goods or services to the MASQUERADE live and/or silent auction. Your contribution to the future of education will be highlighted before hundreds of business and community leader at the celebration and thousands more through our website, earned media and social media promotions.  For more information, please contact Katie McFadden: katie.mechler@gmail.com; 202/701-7400 (cell/text).

 

 

 

 

 

Fun, friendship and fundraising with MMS: Scenes from 2013-15

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Montessori Farm Stand test markets student business ideas

MONTESSORI FARM STAND (3)

 

 

After months of joy and frustration, seventh- and eighth-year students at Mountaineer Montessori School will test-market their entrepreneurship ideas at a series of Montessori Farm Stand pop-up shops in February. The pop-up shop, featuring student designed products and services, will be open from 2:30-5:30 p.m. on February 5, 12 and 26 at the school’s main campus, 308 20th Street, SE, in Kanawha City.

Entrepreneurship is a cornerstone of the Montessori middle school “education for life” curriculum.

Since the beginning of the school year, students have developed their own business ideas — ranging from a garden store to homemade baked goods to monthly breakfasts at the middle school — as a potential avenue for a class micro economy.

“We have seen good ideas and flop ideas, tears of joy and frustration, and continued hard work and dedication through all of the ups and downs,” says Bridgett Steveson, who leads the middle school program. “We have been encouraging students to work from start to finish and not give up. They are finally starting to see the fruits of their labor.”

 

Working with experts

Dr. Gene Coulson

Dr. Gene Coulson

Dr. David Luechauer

Dr. David Luechauer

To fine tune their proposals, students met with local business experts, including Dr. Gene Coulson, executive director of the Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education, and Dr. David Luechaeur, director of the University of Charleston Master of Business Administration and Leadership Program. Based upon expert feedback, students updated presentations, which were shared in a “Shark Tank” style round table to the entire class.

After getting approval from both the class and MMS co-directors, students have been busy finalizing their ideas, finishing product labels, assembling products, and coordinating farm stand times and locations.

During the next few weeks, students will assess the popularity of products, calculate profit/loss margins and potentially add new products to the Farm Stand to support the MMS school garden and other spring projects.

In addition to the Farm Stand, middle schoolers have organized a series of “Parents Night Out” events at the school, which offer movies and pizza for MMS students for a fee. Proceeds also support middle school programs.

“But, above all it is the education of adolescents that is important, because adolescence is the time when the child enters on the state of manhood and becomes a member of society,” Maria Montessori noted.

 

About MMS

The Mountaineer Montessori Middle School, located at 804 Myrtle Road, is the only Montessori adolescent program in West Virginia. It offers student-centered, academically-rigorous curriculum that meets and/or exceeds Common Core standards, preparing students for the “real world” through entrepreneurship, community service and hands-on learning. It is a component of Mountaineer Montessori School, which serves 125 students in an authentic, fully-implemented Montessori environment at 308 20th Street. MMS is the largest, oldest and most established Montessori school in the state, serving an estimated 1,000 children since its founding in 1976.

For more information, please call 304/342-7870.

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UC-MMS collaboration sprints ahead

 

UC-MMS

 

Mountaineer Montessori School has enjoyed a long-standing and mutually beneficial relationship with our educational “landlord” and partner, the University of Charleston.  That collaboration has taken many forms over the years, from UC student teachers and interns in our classrooms, to PE at UC facilities, to special projects and events. Now, that collaboration is sprinting ahead through a new running program to be offered this spring that connects UC and MMS students as they train for a 5K run.

 

 

Message from Hallie Chillag, MMS parent and UC faculty member:

Greetings from the University of Charleston!  Most of you know me as an enthusiastic Mountaineer Montessori mom, mother of Cora who was at our school from 2003 through 2012 and mother of current MMS student, Matilda, who is a third year student in Nancy and Tara’s class. I am writing to you today though as a faculty member of the University of Charleston.

In the current academic year, I have returned to teach in our freshman experience program.  The design of the freshman orientation class at UC has a community change assignment in the spring semester that is aimed to highlight the larger role of the university and the responsibility of graduates to contribute to the larger community throughout their lives. My students expressed interest in working with children and addressing the issue of health and fitness in area youth.  Specifically, they want to gently train area youth to participate in a 5K on Saturday, March 19, that begins and ends on the UC campus.  Ultimately, the project process will be developed into a mini-documentary film for review by freshman experience faculty.

ReadyorNotTo this end, my freshman experience class and I looked to build upon our existing relationship with MMS. I approached Co-Directors Jennifer Carriger and Suzanne Sanders about collaborating on this idea with MMS students.  They brought the idea to the larger staff and last week we agreed to try to work out a schedule to prepare MMS elementary students to participate in the UC 5K event.  Further, I was able to collaborate with Nancy Johnston to work in our PE classes between now and the event to do some walking and jogging, gently building on jogging and running skills week to week, to prepare students for the 5K.

We would further like to offer training to supplement our PE work-outs after the school day as well.  We will open up post school training, starting on February 3, as well to any interested MMS staff, parents, siblings, the middle school, etc. over the course of the next six and a half weeks.

 

Training starts February 3

Race for Education 2015 101We will be offering said training, beginning in front of the school, from approximately 3:15-3:45 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday until our race date (March 19) as long as interest and participation are present.

Ideally, those preparing for the race will be repeating the activity they experience in their PE class twice more during the week, for a total of three work-outs a week.  It is our hope that MMS elementary students will either do this on their own or join us for the post school training.  We have worked to ensure a minimum of three trainers (combination of faculty, teaching assistant, and students) for both our PE class and post school training sessions.  Please be sure to dress your child in comfortable clothing suitable for brisk walking, jogging, and running on PE days and if he or she is able to attend post school trainings as well.

I understand that not all students will be available for the race date, but we are hopeful that our MMS runners will largely be able to participate on race day.

As I mentioned, the race is set at UC on March 19.  A link to the race registration can be found here: http://www.uchalfmarathon5k.com/#!shop/cz1e

Race for Education 2015 098The race has an entry fee of $15 as long as the runner is registered before noon on March 18. Students will receive a race bib and shirt with their entry. If this fee presents an economic hardship for any MMS student, I will waive the entry fee – please just reach out to me as soon as possible so I can make the necessary arrangements to get these students registered.

Please let me know if you have any questions. I am more than happy to answer any questions/concerns you might have.  In 2012, the same type of UC class collaborated with upper elementary to produce a community change project and mini-documentary about American Sign Language and larger deaf culture and it was a wonderfully rich experience for MMS and UC students (and faculty) alike.  I am most hopeful we will have the same significant experience in this go-around!  Thanks for your time and consideration.  We look forward to running with MMS over the coming month and a half!

Warmly,

Hallie

Hallie Chillag Dunlap, Asst. Professor of Social Sciences

halliedunlap@ucwv.edu

304-553-2437 (mobile, voice or text)